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Blogs

Mila Bjelica

posted May 3rd, 2019

I distinctly remember as young girl in kindergarten I bit my cheek while chewing during lunch time. To my utter horror, I tasted blood in my mouth. Like any overly dramatic young child, I ran straight to my teacher to complain and have her take a look at it, sure to get a reaction and elicit some sympathy and comfort. And while she did comfort me, she also met me with a surprising reaction: “that’s okay, the mouth heals fast”.

Recent research by McDade et al. (2019) from Northwestern University has linked low socioeconomic status with increased levels of methylated DNA. They found 2,546 sites of DNA methylation within 1,537 genes, where there was a statistically significant difference between those living in low socioeconomic conditions compared to ... 

Yamna Rizwan

MSc Candidate, University of Guelph

posted May 3rd, 2019

Gender bias is not a new concept. Historically, men were considered breadwinners and women, homemakers. This was due to the belief that women were incapable of doing what were labeled ‘manly’ jobs or intellectual work. These jobs were the reserve of men and not for ‘delicate’ and ‘emotional’ women. It took many strong and courageous women to break into the fields once closed to them to prove that they could do these jobs just as well as men, if not better.

Kaushal Baid

posted Apr 20th, 2019

As the leading cause of death in Canada, cancer is a feared yet very common diagnosis1. In 2017 alone, a frightening $5,636.4 billion was invested into cancer research in the United States of America, yet the “cure to cancer” remains evasive. For those of us who do not believe in conspiracy theories claiming that cancer research is in fact a lucrative capitalist ploy, we wonder why cancer is so difficult to treat successfully.

Mila Bjelica

posted Apr 12th, 2019

Sofia Cruz-Tetlalmatzi

posted March 29th, 2019

Come winter everyone is recommended to get their flu shot. Nothing special about this, right?... In reality, this is an incredible never-ending effort. In 2017, manufacturing capacity produced some 580 million doses worldwide...

Robert G. Ungard

PhD candidate, McMaster University 

posted March 29th, 2019

On March 21st 2019, two pharmaceutical companies, Biogen Inc and Eisai Co, announced that they would terminate two Phase III trials (ENGAGE and EMERGE) investigating their anti-β-amyloid monoclonal antibody aducanumab for treatment of Alzheimer’s disease 

Yamna Rizwan

MSc, University of Guelph

posted March 25th, 2019

Earlier this month, news broke of the second patient ever to be free of HIV infection. The unnamed patient had been receiving stem-cell transplants in which donor HIV−resistant stem cells took the place of their own white blood cells...

Sofia Cruz-Tetlalmatzi

posted March 5th, 2019

When you think of yourself, do you also think of ecosystem that lives inside of you? Well, maybe you should. Not only does your gastrointestinal community of bacteria, viruses, fungi and other microorganisms outnumber the cells in your body, but they have the ability to communicate with your central nervous system.

Mila Bjelica

posted March 5th, 2019

About 1 in 2 people will be diagnosed with cancer at some point in their life, a shocking statistic. Since the 1940s, chemotherapy has remained the first line of treatment for many cancers. Despite increasing remission rates, the incidence of cancer relapse remains worrisome and a great obstacle to curing cancer.

Kaushal Baid

PhD Candidate, McMaster University

posted February 12th, 2019

Many of us, if not all, try to reduce, re-use and recycle waste at home. But how often do we go looking
for the ‘blue bin’ in research labs to dispose plastic waste? According to a study from the University of Exeter in 2014, it was estimated that the 280 bench scientists in their bioscience department generated around 267 tonnes of plastic waste in that year. This is equivalent to...

Sofia Cruz Tetlalmatzi

posted January 31st, 2019

Imagine a living, thinking human brain grown out of a test tube. Straight out of a sci-fi movie isn’t it? Well, turns out that this might not be as farfetched as you would’ve thought. Today, scientists are able to grow mini brains that present active neural networks...

Yamna Rizwan

posted January 22nd, 2019

A scroll through the internet today will lead to an array of websites, books, and magazine articles offering a clear-cut and definitive neuroscientific explanation for every question afflicting the modern human conscience. Why do we make the decisions we make? Neuroscience knows.

Mila Bjelica

posted January 9th, 2019

With the new year come new resolutions, or in some cases revised resolutions with a revived sense of motivation. Weight loss and dieting are among the most common resolutions in North America. Throughout January, major news sources and lifestyles guides will be reporting the newest diet trends of 2019...

Fettah Erdogan

posted May 11, 2018

Medicinal products from plants, animals and microorganisms have been, since ancient human civilisation, the main sources of drugs. Natural products are regarded as optimized drug-like molecules and remain the best sources of drugs and drug leads...

Xiaoyu Zhang

posted June 8, 2017

Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection poses a major global health issue. As reported by the World Health Organization, 71 million people worldwide suffer from chronic HCV infection, and 400,000 die every year of liver cirrhosis and carcinoma...